Porsche 908 Long Tail

For
CH Motorcars

This car won Spa in 1969 with Jo Siffert and Brian Redman behind the wheel. The Collier Collection wanted to repaint the car to represent this moment in the cars' impressive history.

This is the period in time in which we wanted to recreate. Including the chopped up front spoilers.

One of the many details on the car that were fixed, were the rear break air ducts. At some point the ducts were molded into the body. Originally, they were separate pieces from the body that were held in with one screw and taped to the body, to eliminate extra added weight.

After removing the scoop from the car, it was cleaned and used as a mold for the new scoops.

New base for scoops.

Using the correct German woven fiberglass cloth, and Porsches rule of "three layers" of cloth, a very accurate (and light) air duct was recreated.

The 908 long-tails had a problem with lift in the front nose, the factory fixed large aluminum wings to the front of the nose. This apparently created to much downforce and the wings were simply cut away until the desired amount was achieved.

A mock up of an original wing.

A two piece wooden buck was used to fabricate the wings shape out of aluminum.

Factory original style wing complete and temporarily fastened to the car. Ready to be "trimmed" to size according to photos from the 1969 Spa race.

The wings "trimmed" to '69 Spa settings.

Another detail found, was that the three Long-Tail 908's that race at Daytona earlier that year, were fitted with Porsche 356 fog lamps on the left rear. This was to indicate to the pits that they were coming in on the next lap.

The rear side wings had the wrong shape on the front leading edge. Fiberglass sheets were adhered to the wing and trimmed to shape.

As with other cars in the collection, the decals were all digitally reproduce to period photos. We repainted the car in flat white as all the factory prototype "plastic" era cars were painted.

The car complete and back on its pedestal. The green nose was hand painted, the museum has a picture of a Porsche mechanic painting the nose green in the pits at Spa.